Phenotypes & disease challenge models (2013-2016) | Intestinal health and disease resistance in cattle, pig and poultry

Breeding organisations participating in Breedf4Food conduct their business internationally and provide animals to farms located around the world in biotypes which differ in altitude, temperature, feed quality, health status, and human intervention/attention. Designing next generation selection strategies asks for animals which are resilient to challenges, which are able to keep up production even if the environment is temporary or structurally adverse.

Statistical models for robustness (2013-2016) | Intestinal health and disease resistance in cattle, pig and poultry

Breeding organisations participating in Breed4Food conduct their business internationally and provide animals to farms located around the world in biotypes which differ in altitude, temperature, feed quality, health status, and human intervention/attention. Designing next generation selection strategies asks for animals which are resilient to challenges, which are able to keep up production even if the environment is temporary or structurally adverse.

Biomarkers Immune Competence (2012-2016) | Intestinal health and disease resistance in cattle, pig and poultry

Breeding organisations participating in Breed4Food conduct their business internationally and provide animals to farms located around the world in biotypes which differ in altitude, temperature, feed quality, health status, and human intervention/attention. Designing next generation selection strategies asks for animals which are resilient to challenges, which are able to keep up production even if the environment is temporary or structurally adverse.

Biomarkers Natural Antibodies (2012-2016) | Intestinal health and disease resistance in cattle, pig and poultry

Breeding organisations participating in Breed4Food conduct their business internationally and provide animals to farms located around the world in biotypes which differ in altitude, temperature, feed quality, health status, and human intervention/attention. Designing next generation selection strategies asks for animals which are resilient to challenges, which are able to keep up production even if the environment is temporary or structurally adverse.

Measuring enteric methane of dairy cattle

Climate change is a growing international concern and it is well established that the release of greenhouse gases (GHG) is a contributing factor. The European Union has committed itself to reduce its GHG emissions by 20% by the year 2020 relative to 1990 levels. The global livestock sector, particularly ruminants, contributes approximately 18% of total anthropogenic GHG emissions. In the EU, the livestock sector accounts for about 13% of total GHG emissions. Of the various GHG produced by ruminants, enteric methane (CH4) is the most important contributor, with a global warming potential 25 times that of carbon dioxide (CO2).

New traits for protein efficiency and nutrient partitioning

Animal production is mainly based on feeding energy dense diets (corn and soy) animals (e.g. growing-finishing pigs). Corn is also increasingly used as input for renewable fuels, and soy can be used directly for human consumption, and therefore, faces an increasing demand on the global market. This increases the need to improve resource efficiency by making use of low quality proteins for animal production.

Introduction of breeding value for feed intake of dairy cattle

Feed cost is the single-largest expense of dairy production and has increased substantially over the last few years. Although it is a crucial factor in the profitability of the dairy industry, little attention has been paid to improve feed efficiency through direct selection on it. This is mainly due to the difficulties and costs associated with individual feed intake measurements.